As Jack Dyer’s reputation grew for being a tough and rugged opponent and the number of on-field incidents continue to escalate, it was after a particularly difficult game during 1935, when newspaper cartoonist John Ludlow of The Age drew a picture of Dyer as a pirate and a journalist nicknamed him ‘Captain Blood’ after the Errol Flynn film Captain Blood.

What is not common knowledge is that Jack actually hated the nickname as he was angry at the connotation and the implied slur on his sportsmanship. Dyer brought a new type of toughness to the game as he preferred the ‘hip and shoulder’ method of meeting an opponent rather than grabbing him in a tackle. The force of being hit by the athletic, 89 kg frame of Dyer was often enough to leave a player prostrate and not wanting to re-enter the fray for a while.

Occasionally, the hip and shoulder could go awry and Dyer’s forearm would come into play, which was the fore runner to Dusty’s “Don’t Argue” which was a reportable offence. In a nineteen-year career, he was reported five times and suspended only once. It was only when Jack joined the media that he warmed to be calling “Captain Blood”, however he would never use the term himself

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